Surviving The Storm with George Pittman: Home Survival Part 1

Tune in every Tuesday for a brand new essential series on my podcast A Fistful of Truth called Surviving The Storm featuring George Pittman.

This first episode focuses on at-home survival plans and supplies. What would you do if you had no power or water supply? How about food? Do you know how to purify water? What about water storage and solutions to cleaning and disinfecting your water, making it potable for human consumption?

George Pittman, a veteran and former Army officer who served in the infantry, military intelligence & special forces (Green Beret) brings us some essential knowledge, experience and advice on how to be prepared in this and upcoming episodes of this exciting new series that everyone can enjoy.

As we begin with the basics, George goes over our core survival needs beginning with water and food supply. Get your paper and pencil handy and make a list. You can also reference this article where George has prepared a document that will be published in completion at the end of this first segment.

I suggest keeping a good pace with this weekly program in getting and being prepared for the storm.

For Nothing Can Stop What Is Coming and surely, The Best is Yet To Come!

🇺🇸 https://open.spotify.com/episode/2SOaLAZ3jh3PzNAARsxWEE?si=e8e5a4bc281945d4 🇺🇸

George Pittman’s Surviving The Storm Guide Notes: Home Survival Part 1

Home Survival:

Disclaimer: I do not have any sponsors. I make recommendations based on personal experience, but try to provide options rather than endorsing only 1 product or business. My training is a culmination of military & civilian experience over 55 years. My preferences are based on actual use, but opinions vary. I’m just trying to help, but it’s incumbent upon you to do your own research, review safety information & choose wisely.

Introduction: Ideally, your home or residence should be the primary place where you (and your immediate family) can shelter in a survival situation. At a minimum, you should be able to shelter in place at your residence for 2 weeks, but I recommend planning for 1 month or more. The amount of room you have available to store certain things will vary, so your focus may vary depending on urban versus a rural setting, local laws, and other conditions. 

When circumstances force you to leave your home, you’ll have to choose what you take with you. That will be discussed in a separate segment.

This is intended for people who may not have much experience. If you are a prepper or have your own garden/greenhouse, are well versed in edible plants, hunting, fishing, raise animals (chickens, rabbits, cattle, goats, etc.), active in aquaponics, or simply can your own food, you may not benefit as much from the information. However, there may be a few things anyone could find helpful. Choose what is best for you and your circumstances.

Conditions Affecting Survival:

  1. Environment. Depending on the country, region, state or city you live in/near & the climate, you will need to be prepared for the types of problems you could encounter. Also consider the terrain and indigenous wildlife. Focus on the most common risks for your area.
  2. Emergencies. Extreme weather (storms), natural disasters (earthquake, wildfire, hurricane, tornado, volcanic eruptions, landslide/avalanche, tsunami, etc.), & man-made disasters (terrorism, nuclear, biological, chemical).
  3. Socio-Political. Blue versus Red state, level of crime, civil unrest, tyrannical government actions, etc. Basically, is it more friendly or hostile?
  4. Duration. Short, moderate or long term. It might be as simple as a temporary power outage or something that lasts much longer.
  5. Survivor(s) Condition. The physical or health condition (injuries, illness, medical conditions), psychological (state of mind), material (what items/materials are immediately available to you), & legal/moral obligations (babies/young children, extended family, neighbors, etc.). Conditions can worsen or improve based on the duration, so it’s important to continually assess these as time goes on.

Common Sense:

Much of survival is common sense, but many don’t take the time to plan for things that would drastically alter their way of life. During the ‘Plandemic’, many people experienced hardships that they were unprepared for. Simply asking yourself questions and/or considering how you would deal with certain situations can be helpful. For example, knowing what you know now, what items did you need during the initial lockdown? If a different type of emergency happened, what would you need that is not on hand? What would you need during a prolonged power outage, if there was no safe drinking water, or you can’t get to any stores in your vehicle, etc.? If you want to learn more about general or specific survival skills, take the time to do your own research. Some of the skills might need to be practiced. You don’t have to be a prepper or an expert to get through a difficult situation. Being prepared will only make things easier.

Basic Survival Checklist: These items are included in most emergency preparation checklists. Following the list, more detailed tips will be provided.

  1. Water. Plan for 1 gallon per person, per day of safe drinking water.
  2. Food. Non-perishable (canned goods, MREs, survival foods, etc.). 1 month supply.
  3. Flashlight/light source
  4. Emergency Radio
  5. Power Source(s).
  6. Family First Aid Kit.
  7. Medications & Medical Supplies. Prescription and OTC (over the counter).
  8. Multi-purpose tool.

Home Survival:

Disclaimer: I do not have any sponsors. I make recommendations based on personal experience, but try to provide options rather than endorsing only 1 product or business. My training is a culmination of military & civilian experience over 55 years. My preferences are based on actual use, but opinions vary. I’m just trying to help, but it’s incumbent upon you to do your own research, review safety information & choose wisely.

Introduction: Ideally, your home or residence should be the primary place where you (and your immediate family) can shelter in a survival situation. At a minimum, you should be able to shelter in place at your residence for 2 weeks, but I recommend planning for 1 month or more. The amount of room you have available to store certain things will vary, so your focus may vary depending on urban versus a rural setting, local laws, and other conditions. 

When circumstances force you to leave your home, you’ll have to choose what you take with you. That will be discussed in a separate segment.

This is intended for people who may not have much experience. If you are a prepper or have your own garden/greenhouse, are well versed in edible plants, hunting, fishing, raise animals (chickens, rabbits, cattle, goats, etc.), active in aquaponics, or simply can your own food, you may not benefit as much from the information. However, there may be a few things anyone could find helpful. Choose what is best for you and your circumstances.

Conditions Affecting Survival:

  1. Environment. Depending on the country, region, state or city you live in/near & the climate, you will need to be prepared for the types of problems you could encounter. Also consider the terrain and indigenous wildlife. Focus on the most common risks for your area.
  2. Emergencies. Extreme weather (storms), natural disasters (earthquake, wildfire, hurricane, tornado, volcanic eruptions, landslide/avalanche, tsunami, etc.), & man-made disasters (terrorism, nuclear, biological, chemical).
  3. Socio-Political. Blue versus Red state, level of crime, civil unrest, tyrannical government actions, etc. Basically, is it more friendly or hostile?
  4. Duration. Short, moderate or long term. It might be as simple as a temporary power outage or something that lasts much longer.
  5. Survivor(s) Condition. The physical or health condition (injuries, illness, medical conditions), psychological (state of mind), material (what items/materials are immediately available to you), & legal/moral obligations (babies/young children, extended family, neighbors, etc.). Conditions can worsen or improve based on the duration, so it’s important to continually assess these as time goes on.

Common Sense:

Much of survival is common sense, but many don’t take the time to plan for things that would drastically alter their way of life. During the ‘Plandemic’, many people experienced hardships that they were unprepared for. Simply asking yourself questions and/or considering how you would deal with certain situations can be helpful. For example, knowing what you know now, what items did you need during the initial lockdown? If a different type of emergency happened, what would you need that is not on hand? What would you need during a prolonged power outage, if there was no safe drinking water, or you can’t get to any stores in your vehicle, etc.? If you want to learn more about general or specific survival skills, take the time to do your own research. Some of the skills might need to be practiced. You don’t have to be a prepper or an expert to get through a difficult situation. Being prepared will only make things easier.

Basic Survival Checklist: These items are included in most emergency preparation checklists. Following the list, more detailed tips will be provided.

  1. Water. Plan for 1 gallon per person, per day of safe drinking water.
  2. Food. Non-perishable (canned goods, MREs, survival foods, etc.). 1 month supply.
  3. Flashlight/light source
  4. Emergency Radio
  5. Power Source(s).
  6. Family First Aid Kit.
  7. Medications & Medical Supplies. Prescription and OTC (over the counter).
  8. Multi-Purpose Tool.
  9. Sanitation & Personal Hygiene.
  10. Personal Documents.
  11. Emergency Contact Info.
  12. Cash
  13. Emergency Blanket(s).
  14. Miscellaneous.
  15. Firearm(s).

Detailed Tips:

  1. Water. Bottled water that is distilled or purified will last the longest, as long as it remains unopened and stored properly. You can store water in clean, used plastic containers, but tap water may need to be treated or be filtered if stored for very long, prior to drinking. Most in home filters use charcoal or similar to remove most contaminants, so these can be used if you have running water, etc. If you collect water from rain, a stream, river or lake, it should be treated, boiled or filtered before use. I don’t recommend in home filters for this unless you have nothing else. Dirty water can be slowly poured through some type of cloth to remove visible particles & debris, but it still needs to be boiled, filtered or treated in order to remove/kill dangerous bacteria & parasites. Most in home filters are not designed to do this, and may not last long in a survival situation. Boiling clear water for 10 minutes kills most bacteria. There are several different options for purchasing filters. I like the Sawyer brand, because they have different options, they’re relatively inexpensive & can filter several thousand gallons of water. Katadyn, Lifestraw, etc. all make good products. You should read the descriptions, reviews & understand how each one works. Decide which one(s) you like the best. You can purchase iodine tablets, but the most cost-effective means of treating water is by using plain, liquid chlorine bleach (unscented). Add 1 drop of bleach per quart/liter of water and wait 30 minutes before drinking. Chlorine bleach kills all bacteria, including giardia. 1 gallon would require 4 drops and so on. If an eye dropper or similar is not available, you can carefully pour bleach into an empty, clean bottle of nasal spray. This will allow you to dispense drops. I have used bleach to treat water even when traveling to a foreign country to prevent traveler’s diarrhea. Caution: Bleach can burn your skin and damage clothing, etc. Use nitrile or similar gloves if possible & follow safety recommendations provided on the container of bleach. Make sure you clearly mark the container so nobody accidentally sprays bleach up their nose. I keep mine in a sealed Ziploc bag as well.
  2. Food. Purchase whatever you and your family like to eat. Even if you run out of bread, peanut butter and a spoon is better than nothing. Some canned goods, like certain meats don’t even need to be cooked (tuna, chicken, sardines, etc.). Whatever you have, check the shelf life to be safe. MREs (Meal, Ready to Eat) can be expensive, but 2 per day will be sufficient for most active adults. They tend to have shorter shelf life than other survival food, but are convenient for travel. The survival food I purchased has a 25 year shelf life. There are many options and companies to choose from. I purchased a 6 month supply, but for 2 people it would be a 3 month supply. Choose what you like & can afford. Doing some research will give you ideas of survival foods that you can purchase from most any grocery store, so there are many options.
  3. [This list will be continued in the next episode and blog post of Surviving The Storm) with George Pittman on A Fistful of Truth.]

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4 replies »

  1. Absolutely NCSWICN so every Tuesday you mentioned of I will have to check that out and also what I have planned for if in case the power outage does happen where I live which in the community I live in Canada my personal plan is I am going to convert my furnace into an woodburner its very simple and easy to do if a person can understand it and has survival natural instincts lol and well just shut off the main gas valve outside and bleed the rest for about an hour or so in the house or wherever right let it clear out for an hour total with doors opened while having a fire outside in a firepit or whatever to stay warm up until you get the coverted furnace up and running it maybe and then use the furnace as an woodburner simple as that same for water usage a creek may help for or a water plant that is efficiant enough that’s not even powered by anything just flow and downhill stream or even such as a well! of course! or another way is just run a hose from a near by creek using a solar powered little plant to run it into home although dilara I have lived in the wilderness once in my life before and did very well so maybe these ideas can help for others to know but I will know what to do when this all comes down…. Thankyou so much dear friend dilara and again Tuesdays right I will have to check that out the links in the emails you send me on where to watch live or maybe I could join too on a live broadcast and share some details of some more survival skills with yous I hope linda paris and sarge are getting prepped anyways…… GODBLESS!!!!!! Bye for now Sent from Mail for Windows

  2. Thanks for the good info. We all need to be prepared. I will listen to the rest of this series intently. You and George have amazing stories. Time to order a water filter.

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